West Virginia Recycles Day

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Please Recycle

Please Recycle

West Virginia Recycles Day

November 15th marks the national observation of America Recycles Day. Each year, the REAP Recycling Section and the West Virginia Recycling Coalition cosponsor the state’s celebration of this annual event. The Rehabilitation Environmental Action Plan (REAP) strives to clean up West Virginia and rid the state of unsightly litter. The REAP- The Next Generation initiative blankets the entire state cleanup programs contained within the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection. REAP is a powerful force in the campaign against illegal dumping and littering.

REAP focuses on cleanup efforts from both program staff and volunteers statewide. In a unique partnership, the program empowers citizens to take ownership of their communities by providing technical, financial, and resource assistance in cleanup efforts.  Through educational and promotional activities, statewide school contests and county events, West Virginia Recycles Day has gained pledges from thousands of West Virginians who support recycling. 

“Many West Virginians proudly offer their time throughout our state, annually, by volunteering to help clean up our state’s parks, roadways and streams,” Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin states. “I’m thankful for their continued efforts to preserve the natural beauty of the place we love and call home. We couldn’t do it without their help.” 

We strive to accomplish the same here at GSC.   Voluntary initiatives by students and faculty have served to illustrate the need for continued action in cleaning up our community.  From the removal of debris from the local rivers and streams by Dr. Conover’s Ecology class, the continued support of recycling programs on campus, to Professor Brenner’s art students creating works of art using “trash”. 

There are many ways to contribute to keeping our state and community clean.  Find out what you can do to help by contacting GEO (Glenville Environmental Organization), or Professor Noel Cawley, visiting Assistant Professor of Environmental Science.


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