Four Week Grades: Now Available

The first four weeks of the 2014 spring semester are in the books–grades have been posted under EdNet and can be viewed under the section labeled “mid-term grades.”

Why are four-week grades significant? Posting grades early is for the benefit of the student. This is where Glenville State College shines–understanding four-week grades isn’t nit-picky rather: awareness of progress (or lack thereof) in a course becomes a diagnostic tool for both the student and the professor.

If there isn’t a grade posted for a course or there are low grades (C,D,F) reflecting on the four-week record this is a sign to meet with the professor to discuss grades, concerns, and struggles to promptly synthesize course materials to complete assignments.

How to check four week grades in EdNet:

To access EdNet, first open up the Glenville State College web page in your internet browser.

To access EdNet, click on the "Current Students" tab.

To access EdNet, click on the “Current Students” tab.

Next, select "EdNet" located under the Email tab.

Next, select “EdNet” located above the Email tab.

After clicking into the EdNet Menu, select the tab "Enter Secure Area"

After clicking into the EdNet Menu, select the tab “Enter Secure Area”

EdNet will then ask that you sign-in. To do so enter the last 8 digits of your Student ID number  (example 000XXXXX) and your pin number (usually your birth date in the following format: DD/MM/YY).

EdNet will then ask that you sign-in. To do so enter the last 8 digits of your Student ID number (example 000XXXXX) and your pin number (usually your birth date in the following format: DD/MM/YY).

Next, select the tab "Student & Financial Aid"

Next, select the tab “Student & Financial Aid”

Under this Menu select the tab "Student Records"

Under this Menu select the tab “Student Records”

Now the "Midterm Grades" tab should be visible, click on that to check your four week grades.

Now the “Midterm Grades” tab should be visible, click on that to check your four-week grades.

Next you'll be asked to select a term to view. To see the Spring 2014 four week grades find "Spring 2014" in the drop down menu and then click "submit." Your grades for the four weeks will open in a new page.

Next you’ll be asked to select a term to view. To see the Spring 2014 four-week grades find “Spring 2014″ in the drop down menu and then click “submit.” Your four-week grades will open in a new page.

{Remember that four-week grades will be cleared so that midterm grades will show at midterm.}

Tips for meeting with your professor:

1. Dig out the course syllabus. Professors write up a course syllabus for a reason: to keep everyone, including themselves, on the same page. The syllabus can be a vital tool for meeting with the professor when your four-week grades are less than wonderful. In the syllabus you can find the professors office hours and email so that you can schedule a meeting with him or her. Use the syllabus as your guide for addressing concerns about course requirements. And above all, don’t just throw a syllabus away!

2. Act civilized. When you’re meeting with a professor to discuss your four-week grades it is important to use your manners. If you have an F in your English course it would not be in your best interest to demand, yell at, swear, or otherwise be rude to the professor. It’s also not very mature to kneel at their feet and proceed to beg and grovel for their mercy. Professors are here to help you, so be polite and accept the advice that they give. And remember, thank them for meeting with you.

Getting back on track.

After speaking with a professor about your status in a course you may feel overwhelmed. There are several ways to get your grades lined out, starting with utilizing your course materials.

1. Outline major projects, papers, exams, and readings on a calendar (the course outline is also usually found in the course syllabus) so that you can stay ahead of the game and manage your time better.

2. Reward yourself when you finish a project on time. These rewards can be small, like enjoying a latte or attending a campus function.

3. Take advantage of resources in the library. If you need a quite place to study or to work on a paper in between classes the library is a great place to be.

4. Find a tutor from the Academic Support Center. There are tutors from a variety of disciplines so you can seek some guidance for more than just how to find ‘X’ so you can pass your math exam. Check out the spring tutoring schedule HERE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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